Fever has benefits, says medical expert

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….. as GSK unveils Panadol Suspension, Scott’s Emulsion for kids

In an apparent bid to quell the fears often associated with fever, a consultant neonatologist has hinted that the health challenge is not as serious as many believe.

L-R: Dr Dorothy Esangbedo, president, Union of National African Paediatric Societies and Associations (UNAPSA); Prof. Oluyinka Ogundipe (retired), formerly in charge of paediatrics and child health in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH); Kerry Alexander, marketing director, GlaxoSmithKline (Consumer) and Dr Bode Adesoji, GSK’s medical director for Anglophone West Africa, during the unveiling of two brands Panadol Suspension and Scotts’ Emulsion, at Oriental Hotel, Victoria Island, Lagos, on 15 January
L-R: Dr Dorothy Esangbedo, president, Union of National African Paediatric Societies and Associations (UNAPSA); Prof. Oluyinka Ogundipe (retired), formerly in charge of paediatrics and child health in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH); Kerry Alexander, marketing director, GlaxoSmithKline (Consumer) and Dr Bode Adesoji, GSK’s medical director for Anglophone West Africa, during the unveiling of two brands Panadol Suspension and Scotts’ Emulsion, at Oriental Hotel, Victoria Island, Lagos, on 15 January

Addressing participants during GlaxoSmithKline (Consumer) Nigeria Plc’s launch of two new brands – Scott’s Emulsion Cod Liver Oil and Panadol Suspension for Children, which took place at Oriental Hotel, Victoria Island, Lagos on 15 January, 2015, Dr (Mrs) Mariya Mukhtar-Yola, a consultant neonatologist with the National Hospital, Abuja, said there was no universal definition for fever.
She added, in her presentation on “Management of Pain and Fever in Children,” that unlike what many people think, fever is a neurochemical response common to many animals.
“If this definition appears complex, perhaps, we should take that of English physician, Thomas Sydenham which states that ‘fever is nature’s engine which she brings into the field to remove her enemy.’ Isn’t it funny to note that, until recently, I never knew that even cats develop fever?” she quipped.
While attributing the major causes of fever to infection, vaccines, biologic agents, trauma, rheumatic disorder and genetic disorder, Mukhtar Yola disclosed that it was also pertinent to consider its benefits.
“For those who don’t know, fever has its own merits in the sense that it plays a protective role on the immune system, inhibits growth and replication of micro-organisms, and aids in acute body reaction,” she said.
Buttressing Mukhtar-Yola’s claims, Dr Yinka Osho, GlaxoSmithKline’s expert detailing manager, remarked that this is one area Panadol suspension (for children) is different.
“Panadol suspension provides fast and effective relief from pain and fever. It is also gentle on tiny tummies, easier to administer and has a pleasant strawberry-flavoured taste,” he said.
While appreciating the efforts of the key speakers, Dr Bode Adesoji, GSK’s medical director (Anglophone West Africa), said the presentations bordered on three domains, namely pharmacovigilance, clinical research and medical information.
In terms of pharmacovigilance, Adesoji said that today GSK’s products are notable for their robust link to the concept.
“Also, when we talk about clinical research, GSK is ahead. We are different from the kind of people you meet in Molue (Lagos commercial shuttle) who sell all-in-one products (that cure diarrhea, headache, fever etc). Our brands come with quality you can trust.
“Finally, in the third domain where we have medical information and promotional practice. It might interest you to know that GSK has moved from the old practice of paying speakers to participate in our programmes. As part of our transparency policy, we believe that once you have something genuine and important to present to the public, the speakers will willingly agree to participate,” he stressed.
Speaking on Scott’s Emulsion Cod Liver Oil, D. Chikara Nwoke, another GSK’s expert detailing manager said that the product was a brainchild of Scott and Bowne Company, established in 1876 in New York City.
Labelled as “Scott’s Emulsion Cod Liver Oil,” it is said to be rich in cod liver oil, which is a natural source of Omega-3 Vitamin A & D, calcium and phosphorus. It is also said to help children to build their natural body resistance to infections like coughs and colds and develop strong bones and teeth during their growing years.
Nwoke described the product as a brand trusted by mothers for generations to help protect their children from coughs and colds, so that they will grow strong and healthy.
The products’ unveiling had several pediatricians, pharmacists, physicians, neonatologists and nurses in attendance. Notable among them were Prof. Olowu Adebiyi, president, Paediatric Association of Nigeria (PAN); Pharm. Olumide Akintayo, president, Pharmaceutical Society of Nigeria (PSN), Pharm. Ismail Adebayo, chairman, Association of Community Pharmacists of Nigeria (ACPN) and T. S. Dayanand, managing director, GlaxoSmithKline (Consumer).
Others were Dr Dorothy Esangbedo, president, Union of National African Paediatric Societies and Associations (UNAPSA); Prof. Oluyinka Ogundipe (retired), formerly in charge of paediatrics and child health in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH); Dr Olufemi Dosunmu, managing director, Bomi Clinics, Sango-Ota; and Kerry Alexander, marketing director, GlaxoSmithKline (Consumer).

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